Drones and Worker Bees (a.k.a. “TA”s and “adjuncts”)

New studies on drones in California's University hive system suggest that the bees are exhibiting statistically signifiant increases in depression-like symptoms

New studies on drones in California's University hive system suggest that the bees are exhibiting statistically signifiant increases in depression-like symptoms

 

 Apiologists were surprised to discover University hive system of California, wherein, counter to typical apian behavior,  a body of largely non-productive, post-prime leaders known as  “Regents” live on after their productivity has expired, draining the resources of the entire hive system.  Drones in the University hive system  (sometimes called “TA”s or “adjuncts”) typically spend between five and seven years serving the whims of the regents, though trends in  habitat depletion and toxic environments, including the widely publicized Colony Economy Collapse Disorder, have significantly shortened the normative life expectancy of “TA” bees.

While there have been claims that  “the drone [is] …a canonical example of a worthless member of a society,”* without drone and worker bees, the pupae in the University hives (sometimes called “undergrads”) would go untended, and the hives would collapse. Some apiologists theorize that University bees will soon show signs of rejecting and/or evolving beyond the regent system, while others fear that the Regents’ unswerving self-interest will drive the entire hive system to extinction, taking the hardworking  TAs with them.

 *http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Drone_(bee)
Cf.   http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Worker_bee

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2 Comments

Filed under academia, endangered species

2 responses to “Drones and Worker Bees (a.k.a. “TA”s and “adjuncts”)

  1. Augustus Ant, III

    These are funny… Melissa Matteau sent me the link. I’m going to have nightmares about the anti-bookworm.

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