Tag Archives: pink animals

hairless cat: nothing but pink parts

hairless_cat

The Sphynx, also known as the Canadian hairless cat,  has skin the texture of Chamois leather, often covered with “peach fuzz, which displays the markings that the fur would have (were there any). Hairless cats, while follicularly challenged, come in all manner of feline variations (solid, point, van, tabby, tortie, etc). Without the barrier of an insulating coat,  the hairless cat’s velvety skin  feels warm to the touch.  

Known for their extroverted behavior, hairless cats are highly energetic and intelligent. Like all cats, hairless cats  are guilty of near-fatal  curiosity, but make up for their hijinks by demonstrating unparalleled affection for their people.

Indeed, ladies, the next time something warm and hairless rubs up against your leg under the covers, you might want to think twice before hurling the alarm clock at the head of your amorous mate: because the sphynx has no hair to keep it warm, it can often be found cuddling up against its owners under the covers.

 

Finally, the author of BV would like to subit that despite an arguably creepy adult appearance, hairless kittens are, to use the technical term,  pretty goddamn cute. 

2_week-old_female_sphynx_28suki29

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Filed under baby animals, common household pets, exceedingly cute, Phobia-inducing, pink animal league, the strange and the beautiful, Uncategorized

pink amblycorypha katydid

 

This Pink amblycorypha katydid gave his bride a gift, but she wishes he katy-didn't

This Pink amblycorypha katy-did give his bride a gift, but she wishes he katy-didn't

It has been brought to the author’s attention that the Pink Dragon Millipede is not the sole pink specimen  in the insect world; the pink amblycorypha katydid is equally pink, and no less charming at cocktail parties. In accordance with this discovery, the author would like to introduce a short run of “pretty in pink,” a series on roseate  members of the animal world. Whether their behaviors are as rosy as their hues remains to be seen.

The second member in our series (following the Dragon Millipede, naturally) is, as noted above, the pink amblycorypha katydid, a romantic soul and a genetic anomaly belonging to the species western round-winged katydid (Amblycorypha parvipennis). Like other katydids, this specimen  (should it prove to be a hetero male secure enough in his masculinity to wear pink)  will provide a “nuptial gift” of a  spermatophore, a nutritious little ball of ejaculate, to his loving bride.

What the author of  BV would like to know is: will that little love-token be equally pink, and mightn’t the female katydid prefer something by way of a box of chocolates?

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Filed under backyard fauna, pink animal league, rated NC17, the strange and the beautiful, Uncategorized